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Aug 4

http://findanewequation.tumblr.com/post/91685275467/so-for-the-last-four-months-or-so-i-have-taken

findanewequation:

So for the last four months or so, I have taken part in the body positivity movement on Instagram, including posting photos of myself in my bikini and underwear/bra. Keep in mind that none of my photos have ever been sexually explicit or suggestive and that I have always been fully covered. As far…

computeruser-computerloser:

"Hey kids… Want some compiler errors?"

cleopatrashorns:

meulins-choice-ass:

rjs-blog:

Soppy by Philippa Rice

THIS IS EVERYTHING I WANT

This is everything we do. Minus the zombie quotes plus many more. xD

emergentfutures:

Paul Higgins : Please read the rant - well worth it
302found:

emergentfutures:

DreamWorks Releases Software Used in ‘Guardians’
DreamWorks executives didn’t say how much they spent developing the software. They released it in hopes it would be adopted as an industry standard and integrated into commonly used software platforms. This would increase its utility for DreamWorks even if it gave competitors access to an element of the company’s tool kit, according to studio executives.

Full Story: WSJ

Emphasis mine.
This is going to be a bit of a rant, and hopefully a bit more than that. But skip if you don’t care at all about software, business, or open source.
To sum up: Good on DreamWorks, WSJ needs to learn what DreamWorks makes.
If you write that phrase, if you express concern that by giving away a tool (and they did, it’s under MPL 2, a real Open Source license) you’ll lose a competitive advantage in a creative field, you clearly don’t understand the business that DreamWorks is in.
DreamWorks is not a software company. They are not a special effects company. They are a movie company. They use tools like OpenVDB to make movies, to tell stories and attract audiences.
I don’t know anyone who says they went to the Pixar movie because it had better volumetric effects. Outside of the bizarre realm of AAA gaming, consumers seem to pick products like this based on the story.
Yes, new tools may enable them to tell new stories (Guardians sounds like it would have been impossible without great volumetric and particle effects) but giving people the tool doesn’t give them the story, or the writers, the designers and creators, the team that takes the story and the characters and makes a movie.
In a completely different field, Reddit has open-sourced nearly everything. If I wanted to take their code and set up a functionally identical site (I would have to change some assets and look-and-feel for copyright purposes) I could. But I wouldn’t have the community. And that’s why Reddit can get away with this (and why competitors don’t bother taking their code). Because Reddit isn’t a software company, they are a community company.
The article goes on to paraphrase DreamWorks “executives”: “Keeping the new software to itself could give DreamWorks a limited competitive advantage, executives there said” (emphasis mine). These executives seem to understand better than the reporter, if not completely (in the next paragraph: ‘“There’s other stuff that we’ve developed in house that we’re like, ‘No, you’re not getting that,’” said Mr. Prescott.’) that the software isn’t their product or their advantage.
Knowing what’s core to your business and what’s not—what you make and what you don’t, where you add value and where you don’t, and most importantly, the things people are paying you for—is critical to making calls like this.
I don’t know if DreamWorks has much experience with Open Source. The best case scenario is that they work to develop a community around OpenVDB and accept patches and input from that community. They’ll end up with a better tool than they started with, and it might just raise the art of animated films a little.
So, cheers, DreamWorks! Can’t wait to see you open up that GitHub repo and start seeing forks and pull requests.


Great analysis.

emergentfutures:

Paul Higgins : Please read the rant - well worth it

302found:

emergentfutures:

DreamWorks Releases Software Used in ‘Guardians’

DreamWorks executives didn’t say how much they spent developing the software. They released it in hopes it would be adopted as an industry standard and integrated into commonly used software platforms. This would increase its utility for DreamWorks even if it gave competitors access to an element of the company’s tool kit, according to studio executives.


Full Story: WSJ

Emphasis mine.

This is going to be a bit of a rant, and hopefully a bit more than that. But skip if you don’t care at all about software, business, or open source.

To sum up: Good on DreamWorks, WSJ needs to learn what DreamWorks makes.

If you write that phrase, if you express concern that by giving away a tool (and they did, it’s under MPL 2, a real Open Source license) you’ll lose a competitive advantage in a creative field, you clearly don’t understand the business that DreamWorks is in.

DreamWorks is not a software company. They are not a special effects company. They are a movie company. They use tools like OpenVDB to make movies, to tell stories and attract audiences.

I don’t know anyone who says they went to the Pixar movie because it had better volumetric effects. Outside of the bizarre realm of AAA gaming, consumers seem to pick products like this based on the story.

Yes, new tools may enable them to tell new stories (Guardians sounds like it would have been impossible without great volumetric and particle effects) but giving people the tool doesn’t give them the story, or the writers, the designers and creators, the team that takes the story and the characters and makes a movie.

In a completely different field, Reddit has open-sourced nearly everything. If I wanted to take their code and set up a functionally identical site (I would have to change some assets and look-and-feel for copyright purposes) I could. But I wouldn’t have the community. And that’s why Reddit can get away with this (and why competitors don’t bother taking their code). Because Reddit isn’t a software company, they are a community company.

The article goes on to paraphrase DreamWorks “executives”: “Keeping the new software to itself could give DreamWorks a limited competitive advantage, executives there said” (emphasis mine). These executives seem to understand better than the reporter, if not completely (in the next paragraph: ‘“There’s other stuff that we’ve developed in house that we’re like, ‘No, you’re not getting that,’” said Mr. Prescott.’) that the software isn’t their product or their advantage.

Knowing what’s core to your business and what’s not—what you make and what you don’t, where you add value and where you don’t, and most importantly, the things people are paying you for—is critical to making calls like this.

I don’t know if DreamWorks has much experience with Open Source. The best case scenario is that they work to develop a community around OpenVDB and accept patches and input from that community. They’ll end up with a better tool than they started with, and it might just raise the art of animated films a little.

So, cheers, DreamWorks! Can’t wait to see you open up that GitHub repo and start seeing forks and pull requests.

Great analysis.

Technology doesn’t care what zip code you live in, and removes the barriers to educational resources that existed in the past. Students who are growing up on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, intuitively understand how technology works, and are willing to embrace it to enhance all aspects of their lives, from socializing to education. Right now, school is just a game that the students with the best resources win. With uber-personalized online learning, any student can be successful, no matter where they were born.


Unless they don’t have access to technology, then they’re left behind.

- Leveling the Education Playing Field: Technology Doesn’t Care About Your Zipcode | Education on GOOD (via infoneer-pulse)

How old are you?

Anonymous

Well that’s a rather rude question to ask. My age is irrelevant. 

Dear Mitt, Rove, the 1%

I voted for Obama. Apparently you think that is because I want hand outs. The reality of it is not about hand outs. In fact, I don’t want any hand outs. I’m about to graduate for college. I’m about to start a career, one that is offering me full benefits, free health insurance, among other things. I don’t need the government to pay for my health care. In fact, I don’t want them to. However, what I would like is a safety net. One that says the middle class is too big to fail. One that says if something goes very wrong, don’t worry we’ve got you and can help you get back on your feet again. One that says if I can’t provide for my family in the future for some reason, that they aren’t going to suffer from it all. That they’ll be able to stay healthy, get an education, find a great job that does the same as mine. 

I’m going to graduate in a month. And when I do graduate, I’m going to have to pay back a large amount of debt. Debt that was necessary for me to get a decent job. Thankfully I have the skills to go into a great field that pays decently. But others are not so lucky. Others pursued what they love and are good at, only to be stuck with a degree that is useless due to over saturation. Too many people with those degrees and not enough jobs for them to be employed. Those people are going to be stuck taking in low-income jobs. But they’re college graduates. Shouldn’t college graduates be valued? Shouldn’t they be the ones with jobs that pay well? Unfortunately that isn’t exactly the case. Instead they’re stuck with crippling amounts of debt, unable to go anywhere. They’re worse off than those who didn’t go to college. They’re at the same jobs as them, but with a large amount of debt on top of them. But wait, isn’t it you “job creators” that are supposed to help? I don’t see you helping. Just how many “job creators” invest in education, approach education institutions to create programs that are designed to create the workers you want? Why is it that this is a new idea? You want to grow businesses, you want skilled workers, but you’re not putting back into the system. Hell, most large too-big-to-fail companies are avoiding taxes like the plague. You should be happy to pay into the system that creates the infrastructure required for your existence. You should be happy to shape education to your advantage. You should be happy to have workers with the exact skills you need to grow!

But alas, you think we just want handouts. You think we want to sit at home, do nothing, be illiterate, and suck the economy dry. But isn’t it funny? Isn’t it funny the loops that you go through to avoid paying taxes? Isn’t it funny how much lobbying you do to increase profits at all cost and avoid paying for what you need? Isn’t it, in fact, you who wishes to be lazy? Who wishes for handouts by way of tax code loop-holes, job exporting, off shore accounts, etc. Isn’t it you who got the bail out? Isn’t it you, the 1%, who rely most on the government? So much so that you’ll waste huge amounts of money in order for your continued suckling at the teat of America?

Signed,

The voter who thinks. 

courtenaybird:

Apple Stores top Tiffany’s in sales per square foot, again

It is likely that there is no retail outlet in the world that generates as much cash per square foot than an Apple Store.


It is likely that there is no retail outlet in the world that rips their customers off as much per square foot than an Apple store
Corrected.

courtenaybird:

Apple Stores top Tiffany’s in sales per square foot, again

It is likely that there is no retail outlet in the world that generates as much cash per square foot than an Apple Store.

It is likely that there is no retail outlet in the world that rips their customers off as much per square foot than an Apple store

Corrected.

doctorwho:

TARDIS string lights
inthelandofmordorwhereshadowslie:

omg i need these!!!

doctorwho:

TARDIS string lights

inthelandofmordorwhereshadowslie:

omg i need these!!!

8bitfuture:

DirectX upgrade won’t be coming to Windows 7.
Microsoft have revealed that DirectX 11.1 will only be coming to Windows 8, and “at this point there is no plan” for it to be brought to Windows 7 or earlier versions.
Many new games require the latest version of DirectX, so the decision could leave gamers with no choice but to upgrade.

Or, you know, move to linux where OpenGL is king, many games for windows work in wine, and Steam is working on porting games over to the platform natively. Oh, and it is all free. The more people who support it by moving to the platform the better it will be. So make your move. 

8bitfuture:

DirectX upgrade won’t be coming to Windows 7.

Microsoft have revealed that DirectX 11.1 will only be coming to Windows 8, and “at this point there is no plan” for it to be brought to Windows 7 or earlier versions.

Many new games require the latest version of DirectX, so the decision could leave gamers with no choice but to upgrade.

Or, you know, move to linux where OpenGL is king, many games for windows work in wine, and Steam is working on porting games over to the platform natively. Oh, and it is all free. The more people who support it by moving to the platform the better it will be. So make your move.